Trial Information & Gallery

September 2017 Rally & Obedience Trials

ANNUAL OBEDIENCE/RALLY TRIALS

 

 

Held at:

 Tri Cities Dog Training Club
6285 Bay Road, Suite #6 (rear of building)
Saginaw, Michigan 48604

 

Closing Date Wednesday, September 6, 2017

  


Entries can be mailed through the US Post Office or sent by email using the entry form below.

ENTRY FORM

 
Please pay via PayPal if you are emailing the entry form to us. Send completed entry form via email to: jhnash01@gmail.com. Thank you!

 

Please note that the online PayPal fees are slightly higher than the fees stated on the registration form to cover the charges for each transaction made via PayPal.

 

US Post Office mail: Checks should be payable to TCDTC and sent with your entry form to:

 

Janet Nash, Trial Secretary

661 Westfield St.

Saginaw, MI 48602.

 

Premiums will be mailed upon request and are available here:

PREMIUMS

 


 

 

OFFERING BOTH OBEDIENCE & RALLY EVENTS IN ONE DAY!!

 

*NO Utility Classes Offered*

 

ONE OBEDIENCE TRIAL in the morning

Saturday, September 23, 2017

$29 first entry/$21 second – same dog/same trial * each trial

 

OBEDIENCE CLASSES OFFERED:

 

Novice A/B – Open A/B – Preferred Open

Graduate Novice – Beginner Novice A/B – Veterans

 

AND

 

ONE RALLY TRIAL in the afternoon

Saturday, September 23, 2017

 

$29 first entry/$21 second – same dog/same trial * each trial

 

RALLY CLASSES OFFERED:

Novice A/B – Advanced A/B – Excellent A/B – RAE Class

 

 

Entries Limited to 88 dogs of judging per trial

 

REGISTERED ALL AMERICAN DOGS WELCOMED IN ALL CLASSES THAT ARE OFFERED

 

 

 

Pay with Paypal

ENTRY OPTIONS
YOUR PHONE NUMBER:
Dog/Dogs’ Name(s) (in brief):

Entries are now closed.

Mixed Breeds in Competition

AKC is now allowing mixed breed dogs to compete and earn titles in Obedience/Rally/Agility. The program is called AKC Canine Partners.

Tri Cities can help you get started. Not all clubs are accepting entries for mixed breeds but our club does. If you have questions or would like to learn more on how to get ready for competition, please contact Tri Cities Dog Training Club.

AKC Canine Partners Application Form (pdf)

AKC Canine Partners Site

Understanding Dog Obedience Competitions

UNDERSTANDING DOG OBEDIENCE COMPETITIONS AN INTRODUCTION

An obedience trial is an event at which dogs and handlers perform exercises as set forth in the AKC’s Obedience Regulations, and are judged on the performance by AKC approved judges.

As stated in the Obedience Regulations, “The purpose of Obedience Trials is to demonstrate the usefulness of the pure-bred dog as a companion of man, not merely the dog’s ability to follow specified routines in the obedience ring…the basic objective of obedience trials is to produce dogs that have been trained and conditioned always to behave in the home, in public places, and in the presence of other dogs, in a manner that will reflect credit on the sport of obedience…”

Obedience trials, being governed by the AKC, are for registered purebred and mix breed dogs at least six months of age qualified by training to participate. It would be rare to take a dog from back yard training and exhibit successfully in obedience competition. Most exhibitors are products of one of the many obedience training classes held throughout the country. They started training to gain control over their pets, which, after all, is the primary purpose of obedience training. Some find a rewarding hobby in working with their dogs, and the competition that can follow.

There are three levels of training. The average dog in the novice classes has had at least a year of work, and is following practical commands used in every day living…only he is following them according to AKC regulations and has been conditioned to work with their handlers in difficult situations. The second level is open work, which is more stringent, and the highest level, the utility class, is one that only a small percentage of dogs started in training ever reach. The open and utility classes are primarily for those seeking greater perfection in performance or for competition purposes.

Through the Novice Class, dogs earn the Companion Dog (C.D.) title. Through the Open Class, the Companion Dog Excellent (C.D.X.) title, and through the Utility Class, the Utility Dog (U.D.) title. The team (handler/dog) competes against a top score of 200 to win AKC Obedience titles. To earn a title, a team must qualify in three trials under three different judges (soon to be only two different judges) by receiving at least 170 points out of a possible 200, and in each exercise must receive more then half of the available points allotted. The team earning the highest score out of all dogs that compete in a trial is awarded High In Trial (H.I.T.) and the dog that earns the highest combined score in Open B/Utility A/B is awarded High Combined (H.C.)

In a casual observation of the dogs and handlers performing, it appears to the uninitiated that all are working well and all are better controlled than the average pet. However, it is much more interesting to observe a competition if one can follow the judging to some extent. There are obvious infractions that even the newcomer can immediately recognize when they are pointed out to him.

In order to qualify, a dog must, on one command or signal, perform the principal feature of each exercise in an acceptable manner. The table which follow includes the order of exercises in each class, and the principal feature of that exercise, also, the available points of reach exercise are given.

ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS

There are many less noticeable infractions that will affect the final score. It is impossible to list them all here, but the following excerpt from the AKC Obedience Regulations will be helpful in understanding the judging.

“The judge must carry a mental picture of the theoretically perfect performance in each exercise and score each team against this visualized standard which shall combine the utmost in willingness, enjoyment and precision on the part of the dog, and naturalness, gentleness, and smoothness in handling. Speed is not to be considered as the equivalent to willingness and enjoyment. Lack of willingness or enjoyment on the part of the dog must be penalized, as must lack of precision in the dog’s performance, roughness in handling, military precision or peremptory commands by the handle.”

The heel position is involved in every exercise. It is a major part of some exercises, and all are completed with the dog in heel position. Therefore, it should be defined here as it appears in the AKC obedience regulations.

HEEL POSITION: The heel position as used in these regulations, whether the dog is sitting, standing, lying down, or moving at heel, means that the dog shall be straight in line with the direction in which the handler is facing. Be at the handler’s left side, and as close as practicable to the handler’s left leg without crowding, permitting the handler freedom of motion at all times. The area from the dog’s head to shoulder shall be in line with the handler’s left hip”

In the heeling exercises, the handler “shall walk briskly and in a natural manner.”

This has been prepared to give you greater appreciation of the performances you see in an obedience competition. They are the result of patient, persistent training by dog owners who have first accepted the responsibility of dog ownership by training their pets, and then have discovered a rewarding hobby in the competition obedience ring. These handlers enjoy a special rapport with their pets developed only by working closely together. Their pets enjoy a special place in the family because they are well behaved.

Owning a dog should be a complete pleasure, and it can be, if the dog is obedience trained.